Nuclear Emergency

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In the case of a Nuclear Explosion.
Seek shelter IMMEDIATELY.

A nuclear explosion is an explosion that occurs as a result of the rapid release of energy from a high-speed nuclear reaction. The driving reaction may be nuclear fission or nuclear fusion or a multi-stage cascading combination of the two, though to date all fusion-based weapons have used a fission device to initiate fusion, and a pure fusion weapon remains a hypothetical device.

Atmospheric nuclear explosions are associated with mushroom clouds, although mushroom clouds can occur with large chemical explosions. It is possible to have an air-burst nuclear explosion without those clouds. Nuclear explosions produce radiation and radioactive debris.

This Nuclear Emergency website is a mid-term project for WNM 617.
Do NOT rely on this information in the case of a real nuclear emergency.

Nuclear Emergency

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Nuclear Emergency FAQ

Nuclear explosions can cause deadly effects such as blinding light, intense heat, nuclear radiation, fires, and large-scale devastation. Surface level explosions produce radioactive fallout that can affect an even larger area than the blast itself.

A radiological dispersion device or “dirty bomb” is the use of common explosives to spread radioactive materials. A “dirty bomb” is not a nuclear blast and its effects are far more localized to a general area.

What Should You Do?


What Should You Do After a Nuclear Emergency?

Recovery from an emergency or disaster continues even after you return home, as you and your family face the emotional and psychological effects of the event. Reactions vary from person to person, but may include:


All of the above are normal reactions to stressful events, and it is important to let people react in their own way. Children may need extra reassurance and attention. It is best to encourage them to share their feelings, even if you must listen to their stories repeatedly. Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress. Maintaining a normal household and daily routine with lots of time spent with family and friends is one way to help with crisis management. Remember, the emotional toll that disaster brings can be even more devastating than the financial losses, affecting everyone it touches from the victims to the rescuers to those unaffected hundreds of miles away. Being prepared now, and knowing what to do when disaster strikes will make all the difference. Disaster can strike at any time. Are you prepared?

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Nuclear Emergency

Where Should You Go?

During a disaster or emergency, follow the instructions of the emergency responders and media broadcasts. They will direct you where to go to find shelter and safety. Unless instructed to evacuate, the best action is to stay where you are!

Fallout Shelters in the Sioux Falls Area


If you are instructed to evacuate:


If you are instructed to shelter in place:


All of the above are normal reactions to stressful events, and it is important to let people react in their own way. Children may need extra reassurance and attention. It is best to encourage them to share their feelings, even if you must listen to their stories repeatedly. Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress. Maintaining a normal household and daily routine with lots of time spent with family and friends is one way to help with crisis management. Remember, the emotional toll that disaster brings can be even more devastating than the financial losses, affecting everyone it touches from the victims to the rescuers to those unaffected hundreds of miles away. Being prepared now, and knowing what to do when disaster strikes will make all the difference. Disaster can strike at any time. Are you prepared?

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Nuclear Emergency

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Nuclear Preparedness

Where will you and your family be when disaster strikes? You could be anywhere—at work, school, or in the car. An emergency can occur at anytime and without warning, leaving little or no time for you or your family to plan and prepare. What would you do if basic services—water, gas, electricity or telephones—were cut off? Could you evacuate at a moment’s notice? Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene shortly after a disaster occurs, but they cannot reach everyone right away. It is necessary for you to learn what you need to do to be prepared—before an emergency occurs. Knowing what to do is your best protection during a disaster.

What should you do to prepare for an emergency?


Learn what hazards could affect you.


Create your own disaster plan.


What can you do now?


Prepare a disaster supplies kit

Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit before disaster strikes. You should gather food, water, and supplies and be ready in the event you must evacuate or go without basic services for an extended period of time. The kit can be put into five-gallon buckets, duffel bags, or backpacks for quick loading during an emergency.

Water

Five days’ supply, replace every six months. One gallon per person per day. Store in sealed, unbreakable containers.

Food

Three to five days’ supply of nonperishable, packaged or canned food per person. Replace every six months.

  • Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, and vegetables
  • Soups or dried soups in a cup
  • Juices, powdered or canned
  • Milk, powdered or canned
  • Stress foods; e.g., sugar cookies or candy
  • Smoked or dried meats such as beef jerky
  • Vitamins
  • High-energy foods; e.g., peanut butter, nuts, trail mix
  • Sugar, salt, pepper, and seasonings
  • Cereals, pasta, crackers, or rice

Clothing & Bedding

Include at least one complete change of clothing and footwear per person.

  • Sturdy shoes or work boots
  • Warm socks
  • Thermal underwear
  • Blankets, sleeping bags, pillows, mats
  • Hats, gloves, extra warm clothing
  • Sunglasses, rain gear, jackets

First Aid Kit

  • Sterile adhesive bandages
  • 3-inch sterile gauze pads (8–12)
  • Triangular bandages (3)
  • 2-inch sterile gauze pads (8–12)
  • Hypoallergenic adhesive tape
  • 2- and 3-inch sterile roller bandages
  • Scissors, Tweezers, & Needles
  • Sunscreen
  • Safety razor blade
  • Cotton swabs
  • Syrup of Ipecac
  • Moistened towelettes
  • Antiseptic spray or cream
  • Nonbreakable thermometer
  • Latex gloves
  • Petroleum jelly
  • Assorted sizes of safety pins
  • Cleansing agent; e.g., soap, alcohol, or peroxide
  • Tongue blades and wooden applicator sticks
  • Diarrhea medications
  • Water purification tablets
  • First aid manua

Tools & Supplies

  • Mess kits, plastic cups, plastic utensils
  • Flashlights, extra bulbs, extra batteries
  • Battery-operated radio, extra batteries
  • Wooden matches in waterproof container
  • Aluminum foil, plastic storage bags
  • Signal flares
  • Paper, pencils, notebooks
  • Needles, thread, cloth patches
  • Shovels, axe, crowbar, assorted tools

Sanitation

  • Personal hygiene items; e.g., soap, deodorant, etc.
  • Plastic bucket with tight lid
  • Spray disinfectant

Special Items

  • Prescription medications (rotate stock)
  • Aspirin, allergy tablets, cold medicine
  • Hydrogen peroxide, household bleach
  • Denture needs, contact lens solution
  • Extra eyeglasses
  • Entertainment pack (games, books, photos, toys)
  • Baby Items
  • Cell phone with extra batteries and/or chargers
  • Prepaid phone card
  • Checkbook and/or cash

Important Family Documents

Keep copies in a waterproof, sealed container or plastic bag.

  • Important phone numbers
  • Wills and insurance policies
  • Contracts, deeds, stocks, and bonds
  • Passports, social security cards
  • Immunization records
  • Family records (birth, marriage, death)
  • Inventory of valuable household goods
  • Special photographs, pictures

Pets

If you have pets and are ordered to evacuate, take them with you! You may not be allowed to return home for several days during a disaster.

  • Create a pet survival kit to include:
    • Identification collar and rabies tag
    • Carrier or cage
    • Leash
    • Medications
    • Newspapers and plastic bags for waste handling
    • A two-week supply of food, water, and treats
    • Copies of veterinary records
  • Find a safe shelter for your pets before a disaster occurs. Evacuation shelters do not accept pets, except for service animals, and you will not be allowed to bring them to these facilities if you are going to stay there during the emergency event

Remember, if you cannot take your pets with you during an evacuation, do not let them roam free. Shelter them indoors with a two-week supply of food and water. Leaving them confined outdoors or left to fend for themselves will result in almost certain disaster for your nonhuman friends.

Immediately after an emergency or disaster, essential services may be cut off and you may have to survive on your own for several days before help arrives. Having supplies in place before disaster strikes is an important part of any disaster plan.

In addition to your home Disaster Supplies Kit, a smaller disaster kit should also be assembled (in case of evacuation) for your place of employment, as well as for each vehicle you own. These kits should be small enough to carry and be packed with the essential supplies for up to 72 hours in the event you cannot get back to your home right away.

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Nuclear Emergency

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Alerts

There are currently no alerts for your area.

Any immediate alerts will be displayed here.

Where should you get information?

Should a disaster or emergency occur, you should tune to one of the local radio or television stations in your area for instructions on what actions you should take. You will be given instructions on what you need to do to protect yourself and your family. You may contact the HELP!Line Center at 2-1-1 for victim assistance and sheltering information. Unless it is an emergency, do not call 9-1-1 for general information!

Radio

  • FM
    • KAUR (89.1)
    • KCFS (94.5)
    • KCSD (90.9)
    • KELO (92.5)
    • KIKN (100.5)
    • KKLS (104.7)
    • KMXC (97.3)
    • KRRO (103.7)
    • KRSD (88.1)
    • KSOB (107.9)
    • KSQB (95.7)
    • KTWB (101.9)
    • KYBB (102.7)

  • AM
    • KELO (1320)
    • KNWC (1270)
    • KSFS (1520)
    • KSOO (1140)
    • KWSN (1230)
    • KXRB (1000)

Television

  • KELO-TV 3
  • KDLT-TV 5
  • KSFY-TV 7
  • Cable channel CityLink

NOAA weather broadcasts

If you have a National Weather Service Weather Radio, 24-hour weather information can be obtained by tuning to your local NOAA weather station.

Coverage SAME codes:
Lincoln County (046083) & Minnehaha County (046099)

Internet

Go to the City of Sioux Falls website, www.siouxfalls.org.

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Nuclear Emergency

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Volunteer and Donations

For effective disaster management, a statewide network of organizations and agencies is needed to coordinate efforts and respond quickly.

For a complete list of volunteer and donation organizations, please visit www.dps.sd.gov or SD VOAD

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Nuclear Emergency

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Other Resources

Some Addition Resources for the Sioux Falls Area includes:

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Nuclear Emergency

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Contact

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Nuclear Emergency

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Project Sources

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